COVID-19: The long-term socio-economic gap facing poor and developing countries.

BY R.D.

The humanity of education:

The COVID-19 pandemic has had far-reaching consequences beyond the transmission of disease and attempts at quarantine or social distance. Thousands of people have been made unemployed, companies have gone out of business, or sales have decreased dramatically.

coronavirus under the microscope.

The unknown consequences of more than a million people dying and an estimated 50 million others becoming ill, with the number of infected people continuing to rise.

Unfortunately, many low-income families in impoverished communities in poor and developing countries lack access to the global distance learning space, preventing them from catching up to the wealthier towns, counties, states, in these school districts.

Many are already overcrowded, low-performing, run-down structures that are deemed unsafe for both students and teachers due to a high student-to-teacher ratio. Students in several of these educational systems were required to attend classes in the morning and afternoon shifts.

Though it is not an easy task, the pandemic has revealed how fragile economies were prior to the pandemic, as well as the lack of focus on the educational system.

According to experts, these students will miss out on the critical face-to-face socializing process for a child’s development until the global health pandemic has passed.

Several schools that followed the guidelines of social distancing and masking had to close due to new infections, according to reports. Furthermore, these schools have the necessary resources, such as adequate classroom size and proper ventilation.

While communities debate the best course of action to mitigate the effects of science, politics, vaccination, and equitable distribution of resources.

The reality is that for many impoverished countries, this is still a complex issue, and some students may not be able to return to school due to a lack of critical resources.

Photo by Pixabay

Aside from that, many people will object to vaccinations for cultural and religious reasons, as well as a history of mistrust, fearing that they will be used in their development.

Hunger, poverty, and malnutrition, on the other hand, are killing millions, and this disaster appears to have taken a back seat or been eclipsed by many communities, hidden behind clinical trials, vaccination, reservations, rising death tolls, and infections.

This pandemic has taught us that education is about teaching all people, regardless of race, gender, creed, culture, or socioeconomic status, and about building a nation and humanity that will bring our society closer together.

Beyond the vaccine, science, and politics.

COVID-19 exists in two worlds: behind a camera, on a computer screen hidden behind a kitchen counter, in a cafe, or in a corner office, and beyond the articles, opinions, and though it may not be related to a teacher’s engagement.

Photo by Julia M Cameron

This new normal distance learning, hybrid, behind a camera, computer screen tucked away on a kitchen counter, at a cafe, or in a corner office, it’s a fight between the haves and have-nots once more.

While there have been political debates and promises about the COVID-19 stimulus package or money distributed, there has been no accountability or mismanagement of funds, as has been reported.

Many areas have seen distribution along political lines, with the fun lasting only as long as a trip to the local grocery store for those who needed it the most.

As a result, many future local elections will be won or lost based on the amount of money distributed, with overall pandemic management becoming lost in these debates.

Unfortunately, many politicians excel at winning elections before they understand the difference between campaigning and governing. Government is about getting things done, which is far more difficult than being a politician.

We give some people more work than they can handle because they have limited skills.

Several political leaders have issued tablets in many of these impoverished and developing regions, which is a step in the right direction, but it is not the end of the story. There is no internet access, nor are there any resources to pay for it.

Photo by Roberto Nickson

Many of these leaders failed to recognize the technological and educational gap, which is especially important for many poor and developing countries, which can no longer wait for recycled or older computers to become competitive. The wisdom of these students goes beyond the dial-up mentality that has held several communities back.

Experts in the field of technology say that while these devices can be used to access education from a distance, they lack a keyboard and mouse, have a slow processor, and have limited research capabilities. Increasing numbers of young people are abandoning the classroom in search of a better life on the streets.

The economic reality that cannot be masked

When it comes to uploading and downloading life’s journey, poverty is like dial-up internet, and it has held many students back.

According to experts, COVID-19 has already begun to have an impact on academic achievement. Students have been failing at an alarming rate since COVID-19, according to reports. A recent test resulted in lower math, reading, and science scores.

Prior to COVID-19, many poor and developing countries were struggling and risking high tides across the perilous ocean as refugees looked for economic anchorage in any empty classroom.

Photo by Ahmed akacha

These systemic disparities necessitate a new fiber-optic connection to combine hunger, education, and the pandemic into a single long-term social contract, similar to what your local cable company provides with broadband internet, television, and telephone.

According to the World Bank, the middle class has been equally affected, and the dreadful long-term reality of anxiety, fear, and uncertainty is appalling, as they anticipated an increase in poverty.

According to the report, between 70 and 80 million people will be pushed into deeper poverty. There were significant disparities in many areas prior to the pandemic, including education, employment, and access to good, affordable health care.

Is it a matter of budget whether you study on campus or not?

Rich school districts, on the other hand, have implemented an excellent strategy that includes resources, new technology platforms, increased speed, computers, and continuous access, whether virtual, in-classroom, or hybrid.

Parents in these affluent districts are frequently more engaged, have more flexibility, and have connections that can influence the next learning platforms that work with their schedules.

And, while there are legitimate concerns about student and teacher safety, as evidenced by the teachers and their union’s picket lines, these are usually resolved through the school’s budget.

Even with access, this pandemic has devastated many families on the other side of the city, particularly minorities and people of color who have lost many families as a result of this disease.

Healthcare disparities have resulted in more deaths in these communities, and any new classroom format, whether online or in person, will not fill the emotional sadness and gaps.

Who will be there to console a student who has lost a parent or another family member to the disease? In reality, COVID-19 has already widened the gap between the haves and the have-nots.

As experts pointed out, students unquestionably missed their senior proms, hanging out with friends, homecoming, and sports, all of which are critical to a student’s social and emotional needs.

However, the impact of this pandemic will be measured not by these factors alone, nor by political polls, but by the gaps, it will leave in our society.

Furthermore, they will face further setbacks in their educational, social, and economic development; many may not even be vaccinated due to location, and access will remain a barrier.

The only people who could win are well-connected politicians, where questions about the accounting of COVID-19 donated funds have been raised, according to reports.

In addition, the investors as shares of pharmaceutical companies skyrocketed, but one still must give credit to the scientist who has been working and got society to this point.

Today’s teachers wear many hats, including counselors, technical support, financial resource, and attendance advocate.

Teachers have a lifelong effect on schoolchildren, helping them believe in themselves, according to studies, but parents will continue to be the most influential individuals in a child’s education and development.

Photo by Mikhail Nilov

COVID-19 has thrown many teachers into this unknown glass room, where everyone is watching, hoping to get to know these kids through their often foggy gadgets while keeping 20-35 students alert.

The online environment does not provide an ideal platform for recognizing all students’ unique strengths, weaknesses, and motivation levels, which is essential for keeping them all engaged virtually. However, there is a trade-off given the risk of new infections because no one knows how the vaccine will react to new variants.

We can argue that these students do not have the responsibility to go to work; their only commitment is to wake up, log in, and participate, but I can see how many students’ grades may suffer, even if they had a high GPA prior to the Pandemic.

For a few days, the personal check-in was disguised.

I’ve been observing a few classes over the last three months and have come to realize just how difficult it is for teachers to adapt to this new normal.

COVID-19 exposure provides some parents who can afford to stay home with immediate access to their children, which is undeniably beneficial for the parents involved.

Photo by Bich Tran

You get that “I’ll be right back” a lot when you’re wearing two hats, but I understand.

Even though I work in an environment where I am protecting the public and using cutting-edge technology, my somewhat unlimited budget platform has its bad days. However, as the week progressed, it became less painful, and now and then someone appears in this visual space, possibly a school counselor or based on parental feedback.

Students’ opinions, which may be formed for a lifetime, may not have any outside discussion of one’s political beliefs, socioeconomic status, culture, race, national origin, and how few view other groups.

Often, there is a sense of a misguided history from some of these selective lectures, where it appears key decades in our/their history have been painstakingly painted in a much rosier light.

There is no need to be alarmed here, but it may point to broader intersectionality in our community and why there is a continued socioeconomic and racial divide, but given the diversity, I remain optimistic.

Some teachers are extremely helpful and understanding, whereas others, once the slide is completed, please check the folder to respond. What about those who may not have access to a closed online slide from that day’s class to refresh because their connection is at a McDonald’s, far from home?

Let us hope that COVID-19 does not further divide us once we are all vaccinated and can return to normalcy.

Many questionable sections of these PowerPoints will be critical to their development outside of the classroom, such as at lunch, on the field, or while walking to their locker.

Where is Mum when the internet connection is down?

Because of the pandemic, many people are unemployed, searching for a child, caring for their parents, becoming the breadwinner, looking for work, having no support when the WIFI goes down, and the list goes on.

These parents are entitled to additional assistance and resources, such as community groups. Even to help with a homework assignment Recognizing and respecting the fact that each family and child has unique needs is critical.

Many parents have taken on the role of substitute night teachers due to the abundance of assignments and emails. How will they help their child with homework if they can’t explain what’s being taught?

Mental health problems in children, adolescents, and college students are on the rise, according to experts.

More reclusive than usual
Excessive or insufficient eating or sleeping;
Most days, I’m in an irritable mood.
They are uninterested in the activities they normally enjoy.

Parents should be aware of several pop-up learning platforms that offer free computers and dedicated support as an alternative.

They must investigate, as with any sequence-based surveillance, laboratory studies, and epidemiological findings, to ensure that it does not place an enormous financial burden on them and does not fail to prepare the child for the future.

Furthermore, the increase in fishing to lure students away from the virtual classroom to inappropriate websites and even the best internet security can’t keep track of these sites.

I’m logging out for the day with reservations, but I’m still optimistic.

As society rebalances, I hope this pandemic provides a second chance for everyone to close these systematic gaps. Times are tough right now, but I am optimistic if we prepare with a new balanced approach because education belongs to humanity, not a country.

Photo Credit: Forbes
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Published by 😊 ‘OUR SHORES-BLUE SCHOLARSHIP FUND- CHARITY and PROJECTS 😊

With the goal of making students' lives better, the team is made up of people from all over the world. We work with groups, advocates, civic leaders, teachers, and public safety officials who promote social awareness and citizen action for the poor, students, youths, victims, and other groups.

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